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From the Amazon jungle to the North Pole… "Forest fires all over the world"

2019-08-23T00:04:54.083Z

Amid record heat waves, forest fires groan around the globe. Weather experts pointed out that climate change had a big impact. According to the USA Daily USA Today, parts of the world are suffering from large forest fires, including the Amazon rainforest, Alaska and the North Atlantic islands.


Amid record heat waves, forest fires groan around the globe.

Weather experts pointed out that climate change had a big impact.

According to the USA Daily USA Today, parts of the world are suffering from large forest fires, including the Amazon rainforest, Alaska and the North Atlantic islands.

Amazon was originally an area where wildfires were not severe, but experts say that the climate has been aggravated by climate change.

The National Institute for Space Research has reported that there are nearly 73,000 wildfires in Brazil between January and August of this year.

This is a total of 39,759 cases of double occurrence last year.

The huge smoke from Amazon's wildfires covers the sky over Sao Paulo, 1,000 kilometers away, and can be seen in space.
In Alaska, near the North Pole, 570 kW of forest was burned in June after a lightning storm burned the Kenai Peninsula.

The area of ​​loss is large enough to reach the total area of ​​Seoul (605㎢).

Forest fires have become more frequent this year around the polar regions, such as Greenland, where forest fires are rare.

In Gran Canaria, a resort in northwestern North Africa, an unprecedented large forest fire broke out this week, killing more than 8,000 people.

Meteorologists pay attention to the correlation between wildfire damage and climate change.

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration recently reported last month's average temperature was 16.75 ° C, 0.95 ° C above the July average in the 20th century.

The average temperature last month is the highest since 1880 when the agency began observation.

As of July, all nine high-temperature records in the nation's top 10 have been in place since 2005, and all of the top five temperatures in July have been out for the past five years.

Experts say it is difficult to prove a direct correlation between climate change and forest fires, and there may be regional variations, but high temperatures encourage larger and longer forest fires.

Alaska's climate analyst policy specialist Rick Toman says that when there's a lot of fire, there's more vacant land and there's no shading trees, so the land gets warmer. Hotter and more frequent fires.

(Photo: EPA, Reuters, Yonhap News)

Source: sbskr

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