Zhongxin Finance, May 22 (Reporter Xia Bin) A few years ago, when the slogan "Escape from Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou" exploded on the Internet, the endless pressure of first-tier cities fell on countless young individuals, and the word "escape" became more popular. Revealing a little evasion and helplessness, has the direction of young people's struggle and pursuit changed quietly?

  Recently, with a large number of Soul App users of Gen Z as the research object, the Just So Soul Research Institute launched a small survey on the "small town youth's career choice". In the end, there were more than 1,000 people who grew up in ordinary prefecture-level cities, county towns and rural areas. Young people have filled in effectively. They either work hard in big cities or stay in their hometowns, but behind every choice is the true response of young people in small towns to the big era.

  "Go to Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, or go back to your hometown?" This seems to have become a growing motif in the hearts of young people in small towns.

What is a small town youth?

In many media reports, they mostly refer to young people from third- and fourth-tier cities, counties and rural areas, born in the 1980s and 1990s, with a certain educational background and a decent job.

  It can be seen from the income comparison data that compared with other places in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, and new first-tier cities, the overall salary level is a bit higher.

Statistics show that 73% of the workers in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen earn more than 8,000 yuan per month, and 13% of them earn more than 40,000 yuan per month; while among young people working in ordinary prefecture-level cities, only 30% earn more than 8,000 yuan per month; In smaller counties, only 24% of people earning more than 8,000 yuan a month, but interestingly, there are 2% of county workers whose monthly salary exceeds 40,000 yuan.

  Now, when the realities of more intense social competition, singleness anxiety, childcare costs, housing prices and other realities in big cities are in front of this generation of young people, they begin to think about whether their lives should continue to face the ups and downs of pressure and introversion. OK.

  Among them, some people chose to look back to their hometown.

According to the survey data, only 17% of young people from other places who work hard in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen and new first-tier cities have never considered returning to their hometown to work, which means that more than 80% of them have vaguely thought about going home. more than half of them have carefully considered going home.

  There are many reasons for not going home: big cities have better job prospects (61%); big cities have better infrastructure, entertainment and living environment (52%); the salary level in their hometown is too far from big cities ( 52%)…

  However, once the foreigners decide to go home, the reasons are more firm, "I want to be closer to my parents, relatives and friends" (58%), "the cost of living and housing prices in big cities are too high" (49%), "the competition in big cities is too fierce, "Severe involution" (41%) became the top three reasons for their reluctance to stay in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen.

  In fact, the Internet has not only shortened the distance between people, but also leveled some information gaps. The "roll" in big cities has been heard without personal experience.

Statistics show that 59% of young people in small towns who stay in their hometowns for work are unwilling to go to big cities to work.

  At present, the absolute attractiveness of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen has been dispersed by the new first-tier cities, while non-new first-tier provincial capitals, ordinary prefecture-level cities, and even some county towns have grown into indispensable growth points for the domestic economy. The stereotype of poor job opportunities in small cities may be changing.

  It can also be seen from the survey data that the career choices of young people in small towns are more average. Although there is no particularly popular industry, all walks of life can shine.

It is worth noting that 18% of young people in small towns are freelancers, the highest proportion, while 17% are ordinary corporate employees, and 13% work in government departments, institutions or schools.

  Although only 20% of young people in small towns have side jobs, the proportion is not high, but once they have side jobs, their lives are indeed colorful.

According to the survey, they will do part-time farming in orchards, tea houses and other places, or increase their income through painting and handicraft products.

  Does escaping from Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen mean lying flat?

The vast majority of young people in small towns scoffed at this question.

Statistics show that 85% of young people in small towns do not agree with the idea of ​​"lying flat", and they believe that returning to their hometown to work is just the beginning of another struggle.

  It can be seen from the survey that many young people in small towns give relatively positive estimates of the entrepreneurial environment in their area.

Data shows that 54% of young people in small towns think that starting a business in their hometown is difficult but there are many opportunities, while 18% of young people are optimistic about the prospect of starting a business in their hometown.

  "Many markets have not yet been developed" (56%), "many and strong government support policies" (52%), and "lower cost of starting a business than in big cities" (49%) are the three major advantages that young people in small towns think of starting a business in their hometown.

At the same time, it should be seen that they have concerns about the "market size" (57%), "consumption habits" (56%) and "consumption level" (48%) of small cities, because they start businesses in their hometowns Three of the most likely challenges.

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