She said Washington would face "international censure" and damage its relations with Kabul

Taliban calls on Biden to unfreeze half of Afghanistan's central bank funds

  • Afghanistan is still paying the bill for the events of September.

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The Taliban warned yesterday that it will reconsider its policy towards the United States if President Joe Biden does not reverse his "unjustified" decision not to return only half of the seven billion dollars of the Afghan Central Bank's frozen funds in the United States. .

The United States will release up to half of the $7 billion in frozen Central Bank of Afghanistan assets on US soil to help Afghans suffering a humanitarian crisis, and keep the rest to cover terrorism-related lawsuits against the Taliban.

"If the United States does not reverse its position and continues its provocative measures, the Islamic Emirate will also be forced to reconsider its policy towards this country," a statement issued by the Taliban's spokesman said yesterday.

"We strongly reject Biden's unjustified actions, as a violation of the rights of all Afghans," he added.

Biden's plan calls for half of the funds to remain in the United States to cover lawsuits brought by American victims of terrorism, including relatives of those who died in the September 11, 2001 attacks.

"The 9/11 attacks have nothing to do with the Afghans," the Taliban said in a statement.

The statement said the United States would face "international censure" and harm its relations with Afghans if it did not back down from the decision.

Although the perpetrators of the September 11, 2001 attacks were not Afghans, the Taliban government at the time harbored the mastermind of the attacks, al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

On the other hand, in an interview with the official Afghan media, Mullah Yaqoub, acting Afghan Defense Minister and son of Mullah Omar, the founder of the Taliban, described the decision as "severe".

"There was no Afghan involved in that incident (9/11) at all," Yaqoub said, which was followed by the US sending its military forces to Afghanistan.

Mullah Omar was the supreme leader of the "Taliban" at the time of the attacks, and refused to hand over bin Laden.

• Washington's plan calls for half of the funds to remain in America to cover lawsuits brought by American victims of terrorism, including relatives of those who died in the September 11, 2001 attacks.


• Although the perpetrators of the September 11, 2001 attacks were not Afghans, the "Taliban" government at that time harbored the mastermind of the attacks, the leader of "Al-Qaeda" Osama bin Laden.

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