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Para swimming world championship Naohide Yamaguchi is the world new gold Tokyo para representative decision | NHK News

2019-09-11T22:29:06.379Z

The World Championship of Para Swimming held in the UK is the intellectual disability class for men's 100 meter breaststroke on the 11th day of the third day of the tournament.


Para swimming world championship Naohide Yamaguchi is the world's new gold Tokyo Para representative offer September 12 7:23

The World Championship of Para Swimming in the UK is held on the 11th day of the tournament on the 11th day of the men's 100m breaststroke intellectual disorder class. Marked a new world record, won a gold medal, and was selected as the representative of next year's Tokyo Paralympics.

In the World Championship of Para Swimming in London, England, if you enter within 2nd place, you will be given the Tokyo Paralympic qualification and the winning Japanese player will be selected as the representative.

On the 11th day of the 3rd day of the tournament, Yamaguchi, who first appeared at the age of 18, will update his Japanese record 0 seconds 29 in the qualifying class for men's 100 meter breaststroke 1 minute 5 seconds 46 minutes Marked a new record in Japan and advanced to the final in second place in the qualifying.

In the final, the first 50 meters were turned back at the top with a dynamic swim that made use of the bodily physique of 1 centimeter tall and 87 centimeters high. Yamaguchi defended the lead as it was, and won a gold medal by marking the new world record of 1: 4: 95, which shortened the world record by 0.33.

Yamaguchi was the first Japanese gold medal in this tournament and became the first representative of the Tokyo Paralympics for swimming.

In addition, Japanese captain Takayuki Suzuki, who has competed in the Paralympic 4 tournament consecutively, marked a new record of 2 minutes 37 seconds 29 in Japan in the final of the motor dysfunction class for men's 150m personal medley. And won a bronze medal, the second medal.

The winner was Russia's Roman Zudanov.

In addition, in the intellectual disability class for women's 100-meter breaststroke, 19-year-old Mika Serizawa, who first appeared, was 7th in 1 minute 21 seconds 10th.

In the final of the 100-meter freestyle visual impairment class for women, which is not held at the Tokyo Paralympics, Ayano Hataiuchi reduced Japan's record from the qualifying mark by 0 seconds 02 to a new record of 1 minute 0 seconds 29. 4th place.

On the other hand, in the visually impaired class of men's 100 meter breaststroke, Japanese ace Keiichi Kimura was third in 1 time 12 seconds 86, but the Ukrainian side protested the Chinese player who was first. As a result, the video has been checked and the results have not been finalized.

The content of the protest is not clear.

Naohide Yamaguchi "Representative offer is very honored"

According to Naohide Yamaguchi, the first Japanese gold medal to be selected as representative of the Tokyo Paralympics, “I think it was because we have made steady efforts. I want to build up my practice, and I want to do my best to make more people know about the greatness of para swimming and para sports. "

Para swimming in autism with intellectual disability for 2 years

Naohide Yamaguchi, an intellectual disability class, is 18 years old from Imabari City, Ehime Prefecture. I was diagnosed with autism with intellectual disability when I attended a nursery school.

I started swimming when I was a 4th grader, but I started full-scale para swimming only 2 years ago. It was a dynamic swim with a height of 1 meter 87 cm and flexibility around the scapula. I have continued to grow and I have entered this tournament as a third-class Japanese record holder such as a 100 meter breaststroke.

Because of the effects of disability, things suddenly become uncontrollable, so the family makes notes to organize their feelings so that they can concentrate on the competition and control their emotions.

Source: nhk

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