The Lions lost to Canada in the World Cup final in the playoffs with a score of 3–2.

The World Cup jury will judge the most burning topics of the last race day.

Sami Hoffrén

Star of the day

Connor Brown.

The Canadian Vice Captain, who won the tournament points exchange, started the championship with a 3-2 win in extra time.

Nick Paul's counterattack was impressive and was only stopped by a shocking foul.

Jussi Olkinuora, the lion's first goalkeeper who played a great tournament, had nothing to do with the finish goal.

The topic of the day

The video training of the lions was awake.

In the second set, Canada’s second goal was preceded by a clear position with the current IIHF rules.

Owen Power’s other leg was in the midfield, but it was in the air.

The foot should have been on the ice.

The rule will change to next spring’s races, and will follow the rule used in the NHL, among other things, i.e. the Blue Line is three-dimensional: it doesn’t matter if the skate in the middle area touches the ice or is it in the air.

Moka of the day

Tournament fatigue began to show in everyone’s action on the final day of the World Cup.

In the bronze match between the USA and Germany, the international image connection was broken in the middle of the second round.

Extremely embarrassing mocha and a shoe for everyone, but luckily it was just a bronze match.

The steepness of the V-curve would certainly have been second class in the home stands for the World Cup final.

Style of the day

The nuanced and surprising World Cup in Latvia got an exciting game.

Canada’s road to the final was bumpy, but the canuk team once again put everything in the league in the tournament’s main game and tested the Lions ’endurance until the last second.

What was less stylish was that the overtime was settled by three against three.

Stupid.

Surprise of the day

The nerve control of Canadian players at times was badly disappointing.

The inexperienced canker team collapsed into stupid coolers right away in the opening round.

In the final round, Sean Walker took an undisciplined chill in the 1-2 loss position.

Canada occasionally played with a hard Flow, but at times the gameplay went on to elevate.

The feeling took too much against a disciplined Finland, but effective superiority kept Canada in the game.

Teemu Suvinen

Star of the day

The quadruple chain of lions.

Mikael Ruohomaa's chain did not want to find his game at any point in the tournament until a decisive place in the World Cup final.

The grass was in flames and Teemu Turunen and Jere Sallinen also got excited.

Playing Sallinen's mask to Petteri Lindbohm's goal was pure hockey art.

The other chains of the lions were not at their best.

The topic of the day

The Hockey World Cup gold was settled three against three in the playoffs.

Not like this.

World Cup gold should be settled species-by-five against five.

Coincidentally, the role was far too great now.

The judges also forgot the whistles in their pockets in the overtime.

There was something left for the Lions to do.

Moka of the day

The Canadian nerve control totally betrayed during the match, leading to a freeze.

The Canadians played far too hard after the situations.

The lion players did not join the same game.

Marko Anttila, for example, only laughed when Canadians knocked him out.

However, the lions were unable to take advantage of their superiority.

Style of the day

The silence of Canada.

The Canadian game in this tournament was largely dependent on individual performance.

With superiority, skilled players got their rights and vaccinated the Lion twice.

Canada was really rude at the finish line where the Lions had been strong in this tournament.

Now a notable challenger was found.

The Canadian game was not very organized but really effective.

Surprise of the day

The United States rallied after a weak semi-final and crushed Germany in a bronze match.

The young team was still fiercely starving in the bronze match, while Germany was blown out after the semi-finals.

The United States was one of the surprises and bright spots in the tournament.

The World Cup bronze still has value, as US players were genuinely happy about it.

The German players, on the other hand, cried.

Harri Moisio

Star of the day

The decider of the World Cup final is without a doubt the star.

So congratulations to you Nick Paul.

The whole Finnish team must also be raised to star.

We saw some great games and the bench athlete got to enjoy the two weeks to the fullest.

It was handsome to see how GM Jere Lehtinen and Marko Anttila distributed medals to the team.

Won silver, definitely.

The topic of the day

Canada was lukewarm in the early stages like a latte man’s morning coffee.

In the final games, it made “canadians” again and rose to the final.

Canadian petrol was supposed to be over, experts said, and young defenders in particular were expected to make mistakes.

Even the smallest petrol tank was enough against Finnish diesel, legitimate or not.

Moka of the day

The judges, who spoke to Finnish players with familiar first names, came up with the idea of ​​letting Atte Ohtamaa cool in the second installment.

If there was a fault in the situation, Iiro Pakarinen was to blame.

A bit like a witness would suddenly be convicted in the courts.

Now one of the most important players in the Finnish underpower game became a substitute victim.

Style of the day

Owen Power, Canada’s super-promise, left in the air with its hind leg and ice-glorious front leg caused the goal to be rejected after a video inspection.

The Finnish video coach, who, according to C More's experts, signaled to head coach Jukka Jonen that the situation is worth challenging as an offside, still gets style points for this.

Correctly done.

Surprise of the day

What is it that in international hockey, the final cannot be solved as in league games?

The rankings were abandoned, but playing three against three in the final is just as weird.

That’s what North Americans have to explain when they tell their NHL colleagues at home how the world championship in the sport is solved today.