A bombshell in a bustier, good for a record number of clicks on the internet: singer Billie Eilish (19) shows her body like never before, and it is striking that she does that in

Vogue

.

What you used to see in men's magazines like

Maxim

or

Esquire

- beautiful women in seductive poses - you now see in fashion magazines.

What is the philosophy behind this?

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Even the crazy internet could barely follow: when singer Billie Eilish

posted

the images from

Vogue

on her Instagram, one million likes was achieved within six minutes.

A new record.

It is also a bit of a surprise, at the photos.

The world star, who usually dresses in XXL shirts and boyish knee pants, suddenly appears in a bustier and suspenders, with feminine shapes to say 'hello croquette'.

The comments on Instagram are almost unanimous in praise: lots of hearts, lots of flames and compliments of the genre "

You look so powerful

".

That is also what the singer wanted.

The photos accompany the release of a new single called

Your Power

, with which the

Bad Guy

singer says she wants to deal with abuse and control: "It's an open letter to people who want to take advantage of you, especially men."

Vogue

puts it this way: “

She has taken back the power.

” By posing in this way for

Vogue

, Eilish is certainly putting a heel on typical men's magazines.

After all, you used to see these kinds of photos mainly on covers of

GQ

,

Esquire

,

FHM

,

Maxim

, and if it was really naked,

Playboy

. But since the # metoo movement, these magazines have been in delicate waters, the

New York Times

called it an 'identity crisis' in 2019: magazines like

Esquire

suddenly received the same criticism as beauty pageants, namely that they organize meat inspections and mainly depict women as men want them. see.

World stars were reluctant to be on the cover anymore, either out of their own convictions or out of fear of being viewed by other women as an empty-headed man who allows herself to be put to a sexist cart. That's how men's magazines adapted: bikini specials became scarcer and

GQ

magazine

now mainly puts appetizing guys on the cover.

But how is that going?

The world hangs together on opportunism, and women's magazines such as

Vogue

and

Elle

saw the gap in the market.

Vogue

is a magazine where fashion models used to show the latest winter coat or the trends for summer.

But recently two problems arose.

First of all, women today do not just let a magazine dictate 'what fashion is', but base their choice on social media and what they see on the street.

Second, since the pandemic, it is less important than it used to be to be dressed in the latest fashion.

Well, what do you have to do with on the cover?

Vogue

now seems to be pulling the sexy card: Billie Eilish may be wearing the latest collection from Burberry and Thierry Mugler in her shoot, but fashion is an afterthought, it's all about the wow factor.

The same goes for 56-year-old Paulina Porizkova, who appears in a see-through bodysuit at the Czech edition.

56-year-old former top model Paulina Porizkova in a see-through body on the cover of Czech Vogue.

56-year-old former top model Paulina Porizkova in a see-through body on the cover of Czech Vogue.

Photo: Vogue

Last January, model Paloma Elsesser in a wet, transparent dress appeared on the cover of

Vogue

and Dua Lipa showed a lot of cleavage in February.

The other well-known women's magazine

Elle

is not lagging behind.

This month you can see 63-year-old Sharon Stone in underwear on the cover: striking in more ways than one, because a woman who has gone through menopause used to get a decent beige raincoat in Elle, and trousers with a elastic.

Sharon Stone on the cover of Elle.

Sharon Stone on the cover of Elle.

Photo: -

Lots of seductive photos, albeit not quite like the men's magazines once did.

Vogue

and

Elle

do not show any photos in which ladies keep their mouths slightly open or where the top button of a tiny pair of shorts is 'accidentally' open.

What you see are spicy outfits in which the ladies look more dominant or at least confident, less questioning and coquettish.

Moreover, the photo shoots are not so much done according to the wishes of the photographer who hands over a few nobody, but according to the orders of the lady.

"I thank British Vogue for respecting my vision," said Billie Eilish, who herself came up with the idea of ​​wearing corsets like a pin-up, especially because she hates her (bare) belly.

If desired, the magazines also work with female photographers, such as Annie Leibovitz, which sometimes makes the ladies feel more at ease.

So the new sexy is different from the old sexy.

At the same time, the question arises whether you can 'steer' something like this through rules, regardless of the biological reality.

When looking at the photos of Billie Eilish, can you still try to estimate what her bra size would be or experience the clothes as exciting?

Or should you immediately start shouting something like: "What do you look strong?"

With the photos,

Vogue has put

a quote from Eilish that stays in the middle: “

It's all about what makes you feel good.

” Freely translated: as long as it feels good.