You don't talk about money. Our salary slip is a taboo subject. While we would love to know: what should they do on a monthly basis? That is why NU.nl asks for you. Two crucial professions this week: the truck driver and the maternity nurse.

Introduce:

Roger (55, Tilburg)

  • has been a truck driver for fourteen years;
  • drives in the Netherlands, Belgium, France and Germany;
  • transports "everything" from construction products and pallets to packaging materials;
  • works about sixty to seventy hours a week.

Sonja (47)

  • has been a maternity nurse for eight years
  • works in families who have just had a baby;
  • works 60 percent (comparable to 24 hours a week) plus a number of on-call shifts per month.

Roger, how are you on the road?

Roger: "Yes, fine, I was out early this morning, drove away at 4.15 am. I have already been in Germany and have to go to Helmond, Best and Tilburg today."

Sonja: "Do you easily cross the border with all these measures?"

Roger: "My colleagues were stuck in traffic for an hour this morning at the border with Belgium. Annoying, because we do essential transport. How are people at home, Sonja?"

Sonja: "No maternity visits have been allowed for a week since then, to protect the mother and the maternity nurse. But a colleague of mine just called, her family visits the whole family in the evening. You can see that in the whole country: one person sticks to the rules, the other organizes a party. "

Roger: "You really can't, you have to demand that they follow the rules, that's how they play with your life. It's a bit like an STI, with every unprotected contact there is a chance that you will get it. for example, we are not allowed to enter some companies, and then we are waiting outside the door with fifty drivers, hut hat. (Roger cough, ed.) "

Oops Roger, are you watching your health?

Roger: "Yes, no, this is a forty-year-old smoker's cough. If I get really sick, my boss will have to take me home straight away. He will not allow me to work with corona."

Well, to the point: what do you earn?

Sonja: "My last monthly salary was 1,428 euros gross. On average I get about 1,340 euros net per month, which includes all travel expenses and irregular allowances. No world salary. Fortunately, I have a partner who works, because I see the appreciation for my profession not back in pay. What about you, Roger? "

Roger: "My standard salary is meager: gross 2,670 euros per month for forty hours. It is really the overtime, allowances and expense allowances that make it interesting. My net income fluctuates between 3,300 and 3,500 euros per month, so I make Eighty overtime. My gross annual salary last year was seven months - I switched employer - EUR 26,579. Can I say something important? "

Of course.

Roger: "There is really no scarcity. Europe has more than enough of everything."

Thanks for the reassurance. What other measures do you take?

Roger: "I depend on truck stops for a hot meal and a shower, which is a lot more complicated now. So I have a microwave in the truck and now take a few ready meals with me."

Sonja: "I was wondering about that! In our office, special protective suits and masks are ready, if we have to work in a family where someone is sick."

Roger: "Last week I was refused for a toilet visit to a customer. And I was not even allowed to enter the hall to unload the car. I try to keep my distance, but sometimes indirect contact is simply inevitable. Well, we truck drivers do increased risk. And because we go everywhere, we are also distributors at the same time. "