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United Kingdom: Court dismisses lawsuit against compulsory break of parliament

2019-09-06T10:02:20.473Z

London judges do not stop British Prime Minister Boris Johnson: They reject a lawsuit against his sub-house compulsory break. However, it can be appealed.



A London court has dismissed a lawsuit against the British Parliament's five-week forced break. That said Ian Burnett, judge at the high court. Anti-Brexit activist Gina Miller had requested a judicial review of the compulsory break prescribed by British PM Boris Johnson to parliament. Among other things, she was supported by former Prime Minister John Major. Like Johnson, he belongs to the Conservatives.

In their ruling, however, the High Court judges allowed an appeal in the case. The decision goes on to the Supreme Court, which is to hear the case on 17 September.

Miller and her supporters see in Johnson's project a feint to prevent the deputies in the House of Commons on the intervention and so have free rein for his Brexit course. If necessary, the prime minister wants to lead his country out of the European Union without any contractual security. A Brexit without agreement would, however, lead in the opinion of experts to supply shortages, chaos and economic crisis.

The lower house braked Johnson's Brexit schedule this week. Members of his own group voted on Wednesday for a bill that would force him to postpone the Brexit deadline on 31 October if he did not reach a withdrawal agreement at the EU summit in mid-October. Johnson strictly rejects a stay. As a way out of the Brexit dispute Johnson sees a speedy new election, of which he apparently hopes for him favorable majority in the lower house.


Source: zeit

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