LinkedIn finally had to do it.

The professional social network will end its Stories service, inspired by models offered by Snapchat, Instagram or Facebook, announced Liz Li, product director at LinkedIn, in a blog post on Tuesday.

The social network, which is owned by Microsoft, had implemented the sharing of short videos a year ago.

But the success was not there.

Like other social networks, LinkedIn believed it had found "a fun and relaxed way to share quick video updates," said Liz Li, who did not mention a failure.

“We have learned a lot of things.

Now, we're using that knowledge to evolve the Stories format into a redesigned LinkedIn video experience that's even richer and more interactive.

"

After Twitter Fleets, LinkedIn Stories

However, the LinkedIn teams have learned a lot from this experience. According to the feedback collected, users are not in favor of the ephemeral. “It turns out you want to create long-lasting videos that tell your professional story in a more personal way and that showcase both your personality and your expertise,” added the Director of Products at LinkedIn.

Users are therefore not totally closed to the use of video.

According to Liz Li, however, they would prefer that they can "remain without time limit on their profile" and would even expect "more creative tools to create attractive videos."

A new service could therefore appear, once the Stories have completely disappeared at the end of September.

In addition, the professional network is not the only one to have abandoned this format of ephemeral content.

In early August, Twitter ended Fleets, its ephemeral message feature, after launching them in November 2020.

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  • High-Tech

  • Microsoft

  • Internet

  • Social networks

  • Linkedin

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