Google does not plan to develop alternative methods of tracking individual users if the company stops supporting third-party tracking cookies next year.

The tech giant reports this in a blog on Wednesday.

According to David Temkin, director of product management at Google, the future of the internet is at risk if digital advertisers don't take people's concerns seriously.

He points to a study by the Pew Research Center, which shows that 72 percent of people on the internet feel followed by advertisers, tech companies and other companies.

Google previously announced that it will stop supporting third-party tracking cookies.

The company announced in January last year that it would take a two-year period to completely eliminate tracking cookies.

Tracking cookies allow advertisers to track the interests of users across different sites.

With that information, advertisements are shown tailored.

As a result, users suddenly see ads for washing machines after doing a search for washing machines.

“Keeping the Internet open and accessible to everyone means we all need to do more to protect privacy,” Google writes in the blog post.

"That means not only putting an end to third-party cookies, but also the technology used to track individual people as they browse the Internet."