Apple sued for listening in with Siri recordings from users

Apple was indicted in California on Wednesday for listening in with customers via Siri speech assistant, Bloomberg writes. This is a so-called class action lawsuit, to which several people can join.


Apple was indicted in California on Wednesday for listening in with customers via Siri speech assistant, Bloomberg writes. This is a so-called class action lawsuit, to which several people can join.

The prosecutors say their privacy has been violated because people could listen to recordings via Siri. Apple is accused of "illegally and deliberately listening in with sensitive communication without asking permission." It is not known how many people have joined the business.

In the terms of use, Apple writes that the company has the right to make recordings of users for analysis if they use the assistant with the "Hé Siri" command. The prosecutors say that Siri can be called in by "almost everything".

Some of the prosecutors say they would not have bought an iPhone if they knew their orders were being saved. The group wants Apple to request prior permission to listen in and that all recordings so far will be deleted. The prosecutors also demand $ 5,000 in damages per violation.

Prosecutors also say that Apple has not told the truth to the US Congress. The company said that they would not listen if the user did not clearly say 'Hey Siri'.

Employees listened to voice messages

Apple recently came in the news when it appeared that the company is listening to recordings of people. This is done to improve Siri. According to Apple, short fragments of voice commands are listened to. That happens in less than 1 percent of orders, Apple says.

In some cases, people also listened in if Siri was accidentally activated. Dutch voice messages are also listened to, according to research from NU.nl. In addition, it became clear that the identity of listened Siri users can be traced through their contacts and location.

Assistants from Google and Amazon do the same. Hired employees analyze sound clips to improve speech assistants. Google and Apple have temporarily stopped listening.

See also: This is how you delete recorded voice commands from Apple, Amazon and Google

ref: nunl