The former Chinese women's football coach's salary dispute case is still under investigation. The so-called "13-day ban" does not exist. The


  Football Association actively responded to the lawsuit and the national football team was not "globally banned"

  On May 22, the FIFA Disciplinary Committee made a decision that the Chinese Football Association must pay the former French coach Bruno Bini of the Chinese women's football team 1,106,250 US dollars in liquidated damages and 6,000 Swiss francs for legal affairs (international sports arbitration related to labor disputes between the two parties). After the ruling, rumors spread that "if the Chinese Football Association fails to pay the arrears and fines before June 13, the Chinese national team will be banned globally".

However, it is understood that after the case has been tried at three levels by FIFA, the International Court of Arbitration for Sport, and the Swiss Federal Court, the relevant legal channels have not yet been completed.

The Chinese Football Association is currently in active communication with FIFA on this matter, and will actively respond to the lawsuit based on the professional opinions of Chinese and foreign lawyers to protect its own rights and interests to the greatest extent possible.

The so-called "13-day ban" does not exist.

  Salary dispute between former coach and Chinese Football Association

  In April 2018, Bruno sued the Chinese Football Association to FIFA because his claim to the Chinese Football Association (because he was dismissed by the Chinese Football Association in 2017) was rejected.

Relevant information shows that the judge appointed by the FIFA Athlete Status Committee made a ruling that the Chinese Football Association must pay Bruno $1,106,250.

According to regulations, if the Chinese Football Association does not implement the case, the case will be submitted to the FIFA Disciplinary Committee.

  It is reported that the Chinese Football Association has not implemented the ruling since then and appealed to the International Court of Arbitration for Sport.

However, on May 26, 2021, the International Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled, rejecting the Chinese Football Association's appeal and requiring the Chinese Football Association to pay 6,000 Swiss francs of litigation costs.

It is reported that the Chinese Football Association still refuses to accept the verdict, so it further sued the Swiss Federal Court, requesting that the arbitration result made by the International Court of Arbitration for Sport be invalid and that FIFA and the International Court of Arbitration for Sport do not have the right to make a judgment in this case. .

However, on January 13 this year, the Swiss Federal Court also rejected the Chinese Football Association's appeal.

In March of this year, Bruno sued the Chinese Football Association to the FIFA Disciplinary Committee according to the verdict.

  "13 days" is not a "global ban" limit

  It is reported that the Chinese Football Association has the right to appeal in accordance with the regulations, and will respond in writing to FIFA in accordance with the regulations.

It also specifically mentioned that the contract between the association and Bruno made it clear that all disputes must be submitted to the Chinese judicial organs for settlement.

The Chinese Football Association believes that neither the FIFA Player Status Committee nor the International Court of Arbitration for Sport has respected this clause.

The news also said that the FIFA Disciplinary Committee made a ruling on May 25 and notified both parties in writing that the Chinese Football Association’s defense of jurisdiction was invalid, and the FIFA regulations stipulated FIFA’s response to such legal disputes. jurisdiction.

Judgments by legal institutions at all levels have gone through the legal path, and the verdicts are final.

The Chinese Football Association's refusal to pay the relevant amount violated relevant FIFA regulations.

According to the facts of the case, the FIFA Disciplinary Committee ordered the Chinese Football Association to pay a fine of 30,000 Swiss francs within 30 days.

According to media reports, the Chinese Football Association will take the case to the European Court of Human Rights.

  It is understood that "June 13" is the last payment implementation deadline proposed by FIFA to the Chinese Football Association.

If the Chinese Football Association fails to pay, it must provide a reasonable explanation to FIFA.

If the explanation is unreasonable, the Chinese Football Association may also face further penalties.

According to reports, the FIFA Disciplinary Committee granted the Chinese Football Association 60 days to resolve the payment of the above-mentioned payments.

Both the Chinese Football Association and Bruno must promptly inform the FIFA Disciplinary Committee of the remittance and receipt information.

If it continues to refuse to execute the above judgment, the Chinese Football Association may face more severe penalties, including the possibility of (the association's team) being suspended globally.

To be sure, "June 13" is not the time limit for "China's national team faces a global ban" mentioned in related reports.

The Chinese Football Association is still actively communicating with FIFA, and the legal process of the case itself has not actually been completed.

  A team of professional lawyers has been hired

  It is reported that the Chinese Football Association has hired a professional team of lawyers including foreign lawyers to handle the case.

The Chinese Football Association will always maintain an attitude of actively responding to such issues and safeguarding rights and interests.

While responding to lawsuits, they will also fully and clearly understand and master relevant Chinese and foreign rules and laws.

Before that, both domestic football clubs and the Chinese Football Association had suffered losses in the process of dealing with disputes with foreign aid and foreign teachers because they did not understand the procedures or were ambiguous about the rules and legal details. Therefore, the Chinese Football Association was dealing with the disputes with Bruno. , very cautiously.

  Some media commented: "It is not clear why the Chinese Football Association wishes to appeal to the European Court of Human Rights. The jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights is not broad. The Chinese Football Association is an institution, and it is not easy to discuss the damage to human rights as an institution. It has long been common sense in Europe that the employer needs to pay the remaining amount of the contract for unilateral early termination of the contract. This is something that is difficult for the Chinese Football Association to go to the European Court of Human Rights to challenge.” In this way, the Chinese Football Association is facing a particularly difficult situation. the problem.

Of course, no matter what the final result is, the case itself and the Chinese Football Association's response process provide a valuable reference and inspiration for the association and domestic football to deal with similar problems and protect their rights and interests reasonably and legally.

  Text/Co-ordinator by our reporter Xiao Xun/Du Rui

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