The race route of next year's Tour de France will be announced at 11.30 am in the Palais de Congrès in Paris.

But a lot has already leaked before that official unveiling, so that the route can largely be signed already.

Below you can read what is already certain and what the rumors about the Tour in 2022 are.

What do we already know for sure?

Copenhagen gets the

grand départ

on July 1.

That was initially supposed to happen this year, but due to the corona rules, the organization decided to keep the Tour entirely in France and the start took place in Brest.

The Danish capital is considered one of the most bicycle-friendly cities in the world.

It will be the first time that a Grand Tour will pass through Denmark.

With Jonas Vingegaard (second in the Tour this year), Kasper Asgreen (winner Tour of Flanders) and Mads Pedersen (world champion in 2019), Denmark currently has a golden generation of young riders.

The Tour starts with an

individual time trial

of 13 kilometers.

In the following days, two more almost flat stages (Roskilde-Nyborg over 199 kilometers and Vejle-Sønderborg over 182 kilometers) are on the program.

In addition, it is certain that the Tour will traditionally finish on the

Champs-Élysées

on 21 July

.

Everything between Denmark and Paris is still officially unknown.

The route of the first three stages in Denmark was announced earlier.

The route of the first three stages in Denmark was announced earlier.

Photo: Getty

What are the rumours?

But that does not mean that a large part of the route can already be drawn in pencil.

Cycling fans and journalists make it a hobby to predict the course before the official presentation and they are often remarkably accurate.

The Tour organization is already renting out dozens of hotels in the vicinity of the start and finish places before the route is revealed, so that the riders and sponsors are assured of an overnight stay.

Cycling fans search hotel booking websites for places where prices are unusually high in July or places where there are hardly any hotel rooms available.

As a result, they can state with near certainty that the Tour caravan will fly from Denmark to Lille in northern France on the first rest day on 4 July.

In this environment, the first stages will be held on French territory.

Riders slog through the infamous Forest of Wallers during Paris-Roubaix.

Riders slog through the infamous Forest of Wallers during Paris-Roubaix.

Photo: Getty

Dunkirk and Calais possible start or finish places

Dunkirk and Calais are mentioned as starting or finishing places, as is Arenberg.

Near that place is the infamous

Forest of Wallers

, with the toughest cobblestone section from the classic Paris-Roubaix.

It is therefore expected that there will be a 'Paris-Roubaix stage' with several cobblestone sections in the Tour for the first time since 2018.

According to local media, the stage then starts in Binche in Wallonia, after which the Tour heads via Belgium towards the northeast of France.

On July 8 , cycling fans predict a finish on the steep

Planche des Belles Filles

.

This climb has been in the Tour course five times in the past ten years.

The last time was in the penultimate stage of 2020, when Jumbo-Visma rider Primoz Roglic lost his supposed yellow jersey to Tadej Pogacar in a time trial.

Devastation at Primoz Roglic after he lost the yellow jersey in 2020 at the Planche des Belles Filles.

Devastation at Primoz Roglic after he lost the yellow jersey in 2020 at the Planche des Belles Filles.

Photo: Getty

Tour will leave French soil for the third time

Then the riders head for the Alps.

The local newspaper

Le Dauphiné

already predicts the start and finish places from 9 to 14 July.

After Denmark and Belgium, the Tour will leave French soil for the third time with a finish and start (Lausanne and Aigle) in Switzerland.

On July 13, the stage will probably finish at the top of the steep Col du Granon.

Cycling fans hope that the organization will not opt ​​for the asphalted road up, but a narrower route with

gravel paths as well

.

The Col du Granon was climbed once in the Tour in 1986 alone and with its 2,413 meters until 2011, it was the highest finish ever in the Tour.

A day later, on the French national holiday Quatorze Juillet, a stage is expected to arrive at

Alpe d'Huez

.

It will be the 31st time that 'de Nederlandse Berg' serves as a finish in the Tour;

the last time was in 2018.

Turn 7 on the Alpe d'Huez will probably fill up with exuberant Dutch fans again next summer.

Turn 7 on the Alpe d'Huez will probably fill up with exuberant Dutch fans again next summer.

Photo: ANP

Pyrenees and individual time trial

The Pyrenees will also not be missing from the Tour.

After the Alpe d'Huez, the peloton heads for the southwest of France.

On Wednesday 17 and Thursday 18 July there are hardly any hotels left at the ski resorts of Peyragudes and Hautacam.

Just like the past two years, there seems to be an

individual time trial

in the course

on the penultimate day

.

On July 23, the Tour may have its climax in a race against the clock of approximately 30 kilometers.

According to French media, the riders will finish in Rocamadour, a picturesque pilgrimage site in the Massif Central.

From there, the riders will have one more stage: the sprinter's feast on the Champs-Élysées in Paris.

Summary presumably Tour course:

  • Two time trials, 13 and approximately 30 kilometers long

  • Paris-Roubaix-style stage

  • Possible uphill arrivals at Planche des Belles Filles, Col du Granon, Alpe d'Huez, Peyragudes and Hautacam

  • Expected to be six or seven pure sprint stages

  • Three rest days on all Mondays

Keywords: route, race route, alpe d'huez, primoz roglic, tour route, unveiling, the tour, time, finish, wallers, gravel finish, denmark, forest, tour of flanders, stages