UCI investigates Slovenian cycling manager in connection with blood doping

The UCI is investigating possible involvement of Milan Erzen in blood doping. The Slovenian is not only general manager of the Bahrain-Merida cycling team, but also the discoverer of some of Slovenian talents.


The UCI is investigating possible involvement of Milan Erzen in blood doping. The Slovenian is not only general manager of the Bahrain-Merida cycling team, but also the discoverer of some of Slovenian talents.

The UCI confirms to Cyclingnews that Erzen may be involved in 'Operation Aderlass', a large-scale doping network around the German doctor Mark S.

Last week the UCI suspended a number of (former) riders in this case, including Italian Alessandro Petacchi, Croatian Kristijan Durasek and Slovenians Kristijan Koren and Borut Bozic, all customers of S ..

Erzen is one of the founders of the Bahrain-Media cycling team, commissioned by lender Prince Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa. Erzen previously led the small Adria Mobil, where Primoz Roglic developed from a ski jumper to a talented cyclist. Roglic is now the leader of Jumbo-Visma and a top favorite for the overall victory in the Giro d'Italia.

Erzen and Bahrain-Merida refuse to comment extensively on the reporting and only report: "All accusations about possible involvement of Erzen in Operation Aderlass are absolutely incorrect and unsubstantiated."

See also: What we know about the 'Operation Aderlass' blood doping case

Lappartient reports that Slovenia is under magnifying glass

Last weekend, UCI chairman David Lappartient paid an unannounced visit to the Giro. According to La Gazzetta dello Sport , he spoke with the leadership of Bahrain-Merida in the absence of Erzen.

"There are currently no names of riders other than the riders who are suspended in our file," Lappartient said in the Italian sports newspaper. "The area of ​​Slovenia and Croatia is under a magnifying glass with us. I hope that the anti-doping organizations of those countries help us with money and resources."

Roglic called the Slovenian involvement in Operation Aderlass earlier this week "sad." "This is bad for Slovenian cycling. It's like these things happen."

"But I can walk with my head up," says the 29-year-old rider. "That applies to the entire new generation. We are a good example."

ref: nunl