After being subjected to many violent attacks

Asian Americans take their own security into their own hands

  • A demonstration for Asian Americans who fear for their lives after Trump's comment that "Corona" is a Chinese disease.

    Getty

  • New York's governor addressed a large crowd last month to mark the one-year anniversary of the shooting and killing of six Asian women by a white man at an Atlanta resort.

    UPI

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As the night began to fall on New York City, and the temperature was sub-zero, yet women waited patiently in a long line on Mulberry Street in Manhattan, New York City, wanting to get their pepper spray.

The nonprofit group Sur Over Heat had begun giving women about 1,000 pepper-spray sprays that day, as well as alarm clocks carried by frightened Asian Americans, some of whom queued for nearly two hours.

Pepper spray was distributed near the place where the Asian-American, Christina Yuna Lee, 35, was stabbed 40 times by a stranger who followed her until she reached her home.

It is the most horrific of many such attacks that took place in New York on Americans of Asian descent.

"We want to warn ourselves and prepare to protect ourselves," said Kenji Jones, co-chair of Sur Over Heat.

That is why we are not only afraid, but also take defensive measures.”

Since the start of the Corona pandemic, hatred against Asian Americans has escalated throughout the United States, which some blame on the statements of former US President Donald Trump, at the beginning of the pandemic, which he portrayed as a Chinese disease.

New York City police estimates that hate crimes against Asian Americans jumped to 360 in 2021.

state of horror

And when a person shot metro passengers, last Tuesday morning, wounding 10 of them and spreading a state of terror in the city, many Asian Americans feared that this was one of the attacks directed against them. Sunset Park, a large Asian population.

The attacker was arrested and charged with committing the accident last Wednesday, and the police did not announce the reason why the criminal did the accident.

Bored with waiting for what city officials can do, many Asian Americans are taking their own security into their own hands, from joining self-defense training to informal neighborhood patrols.

Reducing working hours

The manager of the Pearl River Mart in Manhattan, Joan Kwong, had to cut back hours for her employees, most of whom are of Asian origin, because they did not feel safe during their late-night return.

Kwong, who avoids the subway, provided her staff with pepper spray and alarm clocks.

One-fifth of Asian-American women say they avoid using public areas, while 6% say they are afraid to return to their work.

In fact, it is not the first time that Americans have suffered racist violence, as this year marks 40 years since the murder of the American of Asian descent, Vincent Chen, who was working in the auto industry by mistake, after his killers believed that he was Japanese, as this country was considered Responsible for the suffering of the Detroit auto industry.

As well as the 80th anniversary of US President Franklin Roosevelt's decision to imprison all persons of Japanese origin, including those who hold American citizenship, in concentration camps.

"We all deserve to live in safety on our streets, on our trains, and in our homes," New York Governor Cather Hochhol said at a large rally last month to mark the one-year anniversary of the shooting and killing of six Asian women at an Atlanta resort.

In response to the anti-Asian violence crisis, US President Joe Biden signed the COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act last May, directing more resources to fight hate crime.

But many Asian Americans say these measures have not made them feel anything different in their daily lives.

• The manager of the "Pearl River Mart" store in Manhattan, Joan Kwong, was forced to reduce working hours for her employees, most of whom are of Asian origin, because they did not feel safe during their late-night return.

• New York State Governor Cather Hochhol said: “We all deserve to live in safety on our streets, on our trains, and in our homes."

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