On the afternoon of the 24th (local time), passengers poured down from the train that arrived at Platform 5 of Central Station in Psemisil, a border town in southeastern Poland.



It was the Ukrainians who fled across the border to Poland on the first train departing from the capital Kiev when Russia invaded early that morning.



They got off the train, which was delayed by two hours from the scheduled time, and looked exhausted from the ten-hour journey.



Those who had to flee their homeland suddenly with only one bag were thankful that they were able to escape the battlefield, but they were all livid-colored.



It was easy to see the refugees with tears in their eyes as they talked about their families left behind in Ukraine.



Irena, who was the first to pass the border guard checkpoint with her lover, put on a desperate expression saying, "We don't know why this is happening to us."



When asked what he was like in Kiev before getting on the train, he replied: "The streets are full of panic" and "Everything seemed to be going crazy".



My lover, Mr. Alexander, lamented that "today is a very unfortunate day for my country", although "I am very lucky to have just got a ticket for this train."



Mr. Tihan, who went on a trip to his hometown of Ukraine and escaped, said, "The anxiety is enormous."



His friend Alex asked for help from the international community, saying, "I hope I can stop President Vladimir Putin. If we wait for an invasion in the middle of Europe, the next turn could be Korea, Japan or the Middle East."



He added, "Russia has ruined the world order. It's a very bad sign." "My family stayed in Ukraine to resist.



Anna, who is currently attending a medical school in Poland, said, "When the air raid sirens were just starting to sound, I got on the train and drove for 10 hours. said.



"War is so bad and disgusting," he said, "I can't even imagine how it could be like this. It shouldn't be like this."



She continued, "Western countries should help Ukraine, as Ukraine has significantly lowered its ability to defend itself compared to Russia."



The border town of Psemisil, Poland, about 10 km from the Ukrainian border, looked tense when a procession of refugees arrived that day.





It is because Poland is on the road to the greatest concentration of refugees, with the number of refugees from Ukraine expected to exceed 1 million if war actually breaks out.



On that day, border guards and police were dispatched to Psemisil Central Station in large numbers, and Psemisil Mayor Wojciech Bakun was also busy inspecting the site.



Central Station has been turned into a makeshift camp for refugees.



Children who came to an unfamiliar place with their parents cried and fell asleep on chairs inside the station.



The Poles were serving hot food such as soup at the station for them.



On this day, the number of refugees entering the European Union (EU) by land crossing the Polish border on the west side of Ukraine increased as the night progressed.



In front of the Ukrainian border checkpoint, queues lined up tail-to-tail, increasing to the point that entry into the country was impossible overnight.



(Photo = Yonhap News)

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