After 70 years of neglect..and subjected to robbery and looting

Farouk's palaces in Upper Egypt come back to life

  • The city of Esna, south of Luxor, will witness the development of 3 restrooms belonging to the upper family.

    archival

  • The palaces were built in an exquisite engineering way.

    archival

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The restrooms of the former Egyptian King Farouk I return to the forefront of the tourism scene in Upper Egypt, after the archaeological authorities announced a project to revive the archaeological sites belonging to the royal era in the south of Luxor Governorate, according to statements by Egyptian archaeological officials.

The sources said that "the city of Esna, located south of Luxor, will witness the development of three rest houses belonging to the Alawite dynasty, but it was known by the name of the last of its dynasty in the rule of Egypt, that is, King Farouk, despite the passage of 70 years since these royal palaces were ignored after the outbreak of the revolution of July 23, 1952, which overthrew the monarchy. This revival is part of the Esna Heritage Revival project.

The ownership of these palaces is divided between several government agencies, as one of them belongs to the Egyptian Antiquities Authority, the second to the Agricultural Research Authority, and the third is the subject of a legal dispute between Egyptian government agencies, the most prominent of which is Wabour Al-Muta’na Palace.

The Luxor archaeologist, Muhammad Fawzi, told "Emirates Today", "The Al-Muta'na restroom was established during the reign of Khedive Ismail on an area of ​​70 acres, and it is reported that King Farouk resided there once during the heightening of the Esna reservoir in 1945, and it is also reported that he used it as a place to rest during his travels to Aswan, and it was reached by the royal train that stops in the east, and then crosses the Nile via a ferry, and that it was built on a wonderful port with a special engineering consisting of marble slabs with a scale to monitor the level of the Nile, and that it was surrounded by rare perennial trees, some of which are still even Now, the palace has been neglected, looted and severely damaged, especially in recent years.”

The funny thing is that the palace contains a picture of the late leader Gamal Abdel Nasser, who was distributing lands to farmers in Esna following the issuance of the agrarian reform law in the fifties.

The Al-Muta’na rest house was established during the reign of Khedive Ismail on an area of ​​70 acres, and it is reported that King Farouk resided there once during the heightening of the Esna reservoir in 1945, and it is also said that he used it as a resting place during his travels to Aswan.

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