In his column in the Washington Post, David Ignatius wrote that the CIA "discovered a frightening thing last October, which was that Russia was moving its forces toward the Ukrainian border, and that, unlike previous border mobilization operations, it was making plans." Secret about how to use it.

He added that the agency was also concerned that the potential conflict zone did not appear to be just the eastern part of Ukraine occupied by Russian-backed separatists, which Russian forces approached last April, but a much larger area of ​​the country, which is why the agency has sounded alarm bells at the agency. Then across the US government.

Ignatius commented that the reports of the Russian buildup could not come at a worse time, as US President Joe Biden was seeking to improve relations with Moscow after his summit meeting last June with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Geneva.

The Russians seemed to be exchanging dialogue on cyber security and strategic stability.

With the escalation of tension last November, the director of the "CIA" William Burns rushed to Moscow to warn the Russians that the invasion of Ukraine would destroy the Russian economy and cancel any hope of rapprochement with the West, but it seems that Putin did not listen and the Russian reinforcement continued With a letter of challenge.

Putin likes to deceive the West and manage the confrontation up and down by sending troops to the front and then blaming America for provoking him.

He wants her to take him seriously and he wants revenge for humiliating Russia after the collapse of communism

The writer believes that Putin likes to practice deception with the West and manage the confrontation up and down by sending troops to the front and then blaming America for provoking him.

He wants her to take him seriously and wants to avenge Russia's humiliation after the collapse of communism, as William Taylor, a former ambassador to Kiev, explains that Putin "wants to pin this to America in any way possible."

Ignatius noted that public opinion may be Putin's biggest problem in both Ukraine and Russia, and as much as he talks about the ambiguous unity between Kiev and Moscow, people in both countries do not want conflict.

An opinion poll conducted by the National Democratic Institute last August showed that 76 percent of Ukrainians want a "fully functioning democracy".

This goal was supported by 71% of those surveyed in the East.

Feelings in Kharkiv, a Ukrainian city near the Russian border, were identical to those in the capital, Kiev.

When asked to name a threat to the country, 82% of Ukrainians referred to "Russian military aggression".

The writer concluded that talking to Putin is one of the ways in which the "lord of daring" can be stopped, as described by a former official in the "CIA", as Biden plans to do so, and provide a decent retreat, but if this fails and invades Ukraine, the United States and its allies This week they will discuss how to get him to pay as much as possible.

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