Teller Report

Now you can see non-English news...

Pensions: "The government does not seek confrontation with the unions," says Marc Fesneau

2019-11-25T19:01:42.642Z

Invited Monday of Europe 1, the Minister of Relations with the Parliament assured that the executive did not seek "the clash with the unions, but the discussion & quot; on pension reform. & nbsp;



Invited Monday of Europe 1, the Minister of Relations with the Parliament assured that the executive did not seek "the clash with the unions, but the discussion" on the pension reform.

INTERVIEW

For the executive and unions, it is time for the last face-to-face before the big day of mobilization of December 5 against the pension reform. In spite of hopes of compromise very thin, the Prime Minister Édouard Philippe began Monday talks with the social partners around a reform gathering against it almost all the unions and the opposition. However, assures the Minister of Relations with the Parliament Marc Fesneau, at the microphone of Europe 1, on this reform, "the government does not seek the confrontation, but the discussion".

READ ALSO - Retirement Reform: "The Grandfather Clause", this way out that divides the government

"We must look at the acts", claims the minister, according to which "the government does not seek confrontation with the unions, but the discussion". And the former president of the MoDem group in the Assembly tacl, without citing them, some trade union organizations which, "postulate, do not want reform". Because, he insists, with the unions "who want to discuss", the door of the government "is wide open".

"Re-interrogate special diets"

While Emmanuel Macron has irritated opponents of the reform by reducing the day of December 5 strike to a defense of "special regimes", Marc Fesneau believes that "it is not offensive to employees to say that there has, in the current system, something of the order of an inequality that must be solved. " "There are special schemes that were built at a time when the hardship and the nature of working conditions were not those of the so-called schemes 75 years later". "We want universality and equality to be masters at the exit of the device and it requires to re-examine special regimes and converge them into a single regime," says the minister.

By making the end of these special regimes one of the pillars of the reform, the government "does not seek to mount the French against each other", denies Marc Fesneau, who recalls that a number of these schemes "are deficit and funded by all French ". Also, according to him, "it is not illogical that French people wonder by saying 'why my taxes finance special diets, whereas I myself can not benefit'".

Source: europe1

You may like

Trends 24h

Latest

news 2020/02/26    

© Communities 2019 - Privacy