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SCP: Quality of life in the Netherlands is stagnating despite economic growth

2019-09-10T06:23:05.294Z

The economic recovery in the Netherlands has not ensured that the quality of life has improved, writes the Social and Cultural Planning Office (SCP) Tuesday in the report The social state of the Netherlands. Satisfaction is at the same level as in 2008.



The economic recovery in the Netherlands has not ensured that the quality of life has improved, writes the Social and Cultural Planning Office (SCP) Tuesday in the report The social state of the Netherlands . Satisfaction is at the same level as in 2008.

"For the time being we see that the growing economy has not yet led to an improvement in the quality of life and people have not experienced that things are going better," the SCP writes in the report.

The SCP interviewed two thousand people. They gave their own lives an average of 7.8, just like the respondents in 2008.

Satisfaction declined slightly among young adults up to 34, single-parent families, middle-income, lower-educated and non-working people. Single people, on the other hand, are slightly more satisfied than in 2008.

Young people are more satisfied with their living situation than older groups

Young people give their living situation a higher rating than older groups. People aged 65 and over have made up for it.

Their living situation has improved over the past ten years. This is mainly because they have more consumer goods, such as laptops and dishwashers, and their living situation has improved.

Almost three in four people are (very) satisfied with their working conditions. That percentage is slightly higher among self-employed people.

In education most burnout complaints occur

The SCP noted a clear increase in burnout complaints among employees. Sectors with many burnout complaints are not necessarily those with much dissatisfaction: in education, employees are relatively satisfied with their work, but there are relatively many burnout complaints.

General feelings of time pressure are quite common, the Social and Cultural Planning Office experienced. Of people between 20 and 64 years old, four in ten people sometimes feel rushed and around six in ten feel too busy.

Young adults (especially with children living at home), people with a higher education level and people with a higher income feel more pressure than people aged 35 to 64 and people with a lower education level and a lower income.

In comparison with 2008, more people said last year that the Netherlands is moving in the right direction. More people than before are satisfied with democracy and the government, but a substantial and stable part of the population is cynical about politics.

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Source: nunl

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