Chinese military warns Hong Kong protesters for the first time

China's military commander in Hong Kong, Chen Daoxiang, condemned anti-government demonstrations in the city and warned that violence will not be tolerated in his first comment on the protests that have rocked the city since last June. The South China Morning Post About Daoxiang


The head of the Chinese forces in Hong Kong, Chen Daoxiang, condemned anti-government demonstrations in the city and warned that violence will not be tolerated in his first comment on the protests that have rocked the city since June.

Daoxiang said at a reception in Hong Kong late yesterday to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) that "a series of very violent acts" took place recently. Business has damaged the prosperity and stability of the city, and challenged the rule of law and social order ».

"These actions have seriously threatened the lives and safety of Hong Kong's citizens," he said. "We should not be complacent, and we express our strong conviction for these actions."

Mass demonstrations began on June 9 in Hong Kong, the former semi-autonomous British colony, to protest a bill allowing extradition to China.

In recent weeks, demonstrations have expanded to include protests against the Hong Kong government and police brutality.

Exercises

South China's Army Daily reported that the military commander had posted a three-minute video on Thursday, showing soldiers participating in anti-riot maneuvers.

The footage showed footage of soldiers and military vehicles moving in empty streets, hills that appeared to be in Hong Kong, and soldiers firing on invisible targets.

"You bear all the consequences," he says in a shot of a soldier. In other passages, the soldiers appear as they are escorted by civilians.

The video was released amid concerns about a growing military presence on the border. The South China newspaper reported that 190,000 policemen were deployed in Guangdong province, which borders Hong Kong, to participate in exercises before the anniversary of the founding of the People's Liberation Army.

Although it is common for the Liberation Army to conduct maneuvers near the border, increasing border police has raised concerns outside the city because of the recent unrest and Beijing's limited tolerance of political opposition.

US National Security Adviser John Bolton told Fox News that he "heard rumors from friends in the region" that the PLA was mobilizing troops.

Bolton said he was worried that Hong Kong could slip into a scenario similar to that in Tiananmen Square in Beijing in 1989, when demonstrations calling for democracy ended with military repression.

"I will say that I hope that those who remember what happened in Tiananmen Square in June 1989 will remember that," he said.

A video showed footage of soldiers and military vehicles moving in empty streets, hills that appeared to be in Hong Kong, and soldiers firing at invisible targets.

ref: emara