Johnson and Hunt are the last to compete for British premiership

Boris Johnson or Jeremy Hunt will be the new prime minister of the United Kingdom. The fifth and final round of voting within the Conservative Party on Thursday evening proved that. Michael Gove did not receive enough votes in that round and fell to the last minute in the race for the party leadership.


Boris Johnson or Jeremy Hunt will be the new prime minister of the United Kingdom. The fifth and final round of voting within the Conservative Party on Thursday evening proved that. Michael Gove did not receive enough votes in that round and fell to the last minute in the race for the party leadership.

Results of the fifth voting

  • Boris Johnson: 160 votes
  • Jeremy Hunt: 77 votes
  • Michael Gove: 75 votes

Now that there are two candidates left, it is up to the approximately 160,000 members of the Conservative Party to speak out about who should become the party leader.

The 54-year-old Johnson is the big favorite. He received no less than 160 of the 313 votes in the last vote. His competitor Hunt received 77 votes, two more than Gove. Sajid Javid dropped out at a fourth round earlier on Thursday afternoon, so there was one more vote.

A leader must be chosen because of the departure of British Prime Minister Theresa May. Although she has already officially submitted her resignation, she will remain in office until there is a successor.

Johnson versus Hunt

Former Foreign Minister Johnson was mayor of London for eight years. He is not afraid of a hard Brexit - one without an exit agreement - and was one of the most prominent figures within the Vote Leave organization, which campaigned for a British exit in the run-up to the 2016 referendum.

52-year-old Hunt has stood on both sides of the Brexit. The politician has campaigned to keep the British in the EU, but since the referendum he has suggested that he be in favor of leaving and not to fear a 'no-deal Brexit'. He held various ministerial posts and was the Minister of Health for almost six years.

Originally ten candidates to succeed May

Originally ten candidates had a chance to succeed May. The contenders previously had to drag in at least eight nominations from party members in the Lower House to be put on the list of candidates.

Former Lagerhuis chairman Andrea Leadsom dropped out in the first round. Former Brexit minister Dominic Raab was eliminated in the second round. Rory Stewart happened the same in the third round. Esther McVey, Matt Hancock and Mark Harper decided to leave the race themselves for a variety of reasons. On Thursday, Javid and Gove were the last to join the dropouts.

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