International condemnations of the attacks by Sri Lanka and Turkey consider them as the crime of New Zealand


International condemnation of bombings in churches and hotels in the Sri Lankan capital of Colombo has continued, leaving at least 207 dead and hundreds wounded.

The Qatari Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani sent a cable of condolences to Sri Lankan President Maitripala Seressina, expressing his sincere condolences and condolences to the victims of the bombings.

He expressed his "strong condemnation of this heinous crime," stressing "the firm position of the State of Qatar to reject violence and terrorism, whatever the motives and reasons."

The Qatar Foreign Ministry expressed its shock at Qatar's "outrageous and horrific crime" and renewed its "firm stance on the rejection of violence and terrorism," stressing Qatar's total refusal to target places of worship and intimidate the safe.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan strongly condemned the attacks on churches and hotels in Sri Lanka and said he strongly condemned the terrorist attacks in conjunction with Easter in Sri Lanka.

"My deepest condolences are in my name and on behalf of my people to the families of the victims who died in the attack, and to all the Sri Lankan people, and I wish the speedy recovery of the wounded."

The Sri Lankan attacks showed once again the need for a resolute fight against terrorism of all kinds, Erdogan said.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mouloud Gawishoglu also condemned the attacks. "I condemn the terrorist attacks that targeted innocent people in churches and hotels during the Easter celebrations in Sri Lanka," he said in a tweet posted on his Twitter account.

International stances underscore refusal to intimidate the safe (Reuters)

In turn, the Turkish Foreign Ministry condemned the statement of attacks, saying it was no different from the killing of worshipers in New Zealand.

She stressed that these "treacherous attacks" once again demonstrated the need for a common fight against extremism and terrorism, stressing that Turkey would continue to stand by Sri Lanka in the fight against terrorism.

British Prime Minister Teresa Mae also condemned the Sri Lankan attacks. "We have to unite to make sure that no one practices his faith in fear," she said, expressing "deep condolences" to "all the people affected."

British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said he was "profoundly saddened and saddened by these terrible attacks on churches and hotels in Sri Lanka today."

"The targeting of those who gathered for Easter prayers is a terrible act," he wrote in a tweet.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker expressed his feeling of "sadness" after the attacks. "I have been very shocked and saddened by the attacks that have cost so many people their lives," he said.

He expressed his condolences to the families of "victims who gathered to pray in peace or came to visit this beautiful country," adding "we are ready to give our support."

French President Emmanuel Macaron strongly condemned the "heinous acts" and "terrorist attacks" in Sri Lanka, and wrote on Twitter: "Deep sorrow after the terrorist attacks on churches and hotels in Sri Lanka. We strongly condemn these heinous acts."

Pope Francis expressed his "sadness" after the attacks, stressing that he was "close to all the victims of this brutal violence."

US President Donald Trump also condemned the "horrific terrorist" attacks in Sri Lanka and offered his condolences.

"The religious hatred and fanaticism that have emerged in a terrible way today must not be won," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said in a condolence telegram, a spokesman on Twitter said on Sunday, regretting that "the people who gathered to celebrate Easter were deliberately targeted."

ref: aljazeera

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