• Health The formula to avoid massive infection without restrictions: "We must say loud and clear that Covid is airborne and act accordingly"

A new study on the coronavirus published in the scientific journal

Nature Communications

and directed

by researchers at Imperial College London has found that people with

higher levels of T cells

from the

coronaviruses

that cause

common colds

are less likely to be infected with

SARS-CoV-2

.

While previous studies have shown that T cells induced by other coronaviruses can recognize SARS-CoV-2, this research examines for the first time how the presence of these T cells at the time of exposure to SARS-CoV-2

influences someone get infected.

update narration

07.40.

The key to immunity against coronavirus lies in the common cold

People with higher levels of T cells from the

coronaviruses

that cause common colds are less likely to be infected with

SARS-CoV-2

, according to a new study published in the scientific journal

Nature Communications

and aimed at

by researchers at Imperial College London (UK)

.

While previous studies have shown that T cells induced by other coronaviruses can recognize

SARS-CoV-2

, this research examines for the first time how the presence of these T cells at the time of exposure to

SARS-CoV-2

influences someone get infected

.

The researchers also claim that their findings provide

a blueprint for a universal vaccine

of second generation that could prevent infection by current and future variants of

SARS-CoV-2

, including

omicron

.

"Exposure to the

SARS-CoV-2

virus does not always lead to infection, and we wanted to understand why. We found that high levels of pre-existing T cells, created by the body when infected with other human coronaviruses such as the common cold,

can protect against infection with the

Covid-19

virus .

Although this is an important discovery, it is only one form of protection, and I would like to stress that the best way to protect yourself against

Covid-19

is to be fully vaccinated

,

including your booster dose," said Dr Rhia Kundu, first study author, from the National Heart and Lung Institute at Imperial College London.

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