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A father carries his son in his arms.

Like many others, the two of them have to hold out at a campsite in Shaver Lake, California, as the roads have become impassable due to the fire and smoke.


A fire-fighting aircraft unloads red powder over a forest area in the north of Monrovia, where more than 10,500 hectares of forest were already burning by September 11th.

The chemical is supposed to inhibit the fire.


A firefighter assesses the situation in Monrovia after a fire has been extinguished.

The traces of the fire-retardant powder from the fire-fighting aircraft are still clearly visible on the rock.


In Lake Oroville, the Bidwell Bar Bridge is surrounded by fires.

Dry winds rekindled the embers in many places on Thursday.

Hundreds of people had to be flown out of the endangered areas in helicopters.

Tens of thousands were left in the dark because of power outages across the western United States.


The pictures of the destruction are huge, like here from Fresno County.

More than half a million people have fled their homes in California.


More than 20,000 firefighters from across the United States are on duty, like here in Madera County.


The smoke from the fires drifts for miles, like here in Shaver Lake.


The smoke also darkens the sky over San Francisco.

The picture along Hyde Street, with Fisherman's Wharf and Alcatraz in the background, was taken at 12:30 p.m.


"All clear" - the poster on a garage door in Fresno County is supposed to signal to rescue workers that all residents here have fled.


Only apparently beautiful: smoke over a forest in Madera County.


The fires are also raging in Oregon.

A fire brigade takes a short rest in Berry Creek.

In the background, the charred remains of the local elementary school, which was destroyed overnight during the Bear Fire.


Lake Oroville has little water, with smoke rising from the burning forest in the background.

On the west coast of the United States, in California and Oregon, the wildfires are raging more devastating than ever this year.

They have already destroyed an area of ​​more than 930,000 hectares - that's more forest than the densely wooded state of Hesse has.

20,000 firefighters from across the United States are on duty.

More than half a million people have fled their homes.

Tens of thousands were left in the dark because of power outages across the western United States.

Dry winds fan the embers again and again.

Experts estimate that the fires will continue to burn through December.