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How would you like Fukushima's polluted water? The problem is liquid tritium

2019-08-19T11:38:08.474Z

More than one million tons of contaminated water is currently stored at Fukushima nuclear power plant, and about 200 tons of contaminated water are being accumulated every day. It seems that hundreds of trillion won will be spent only to handle it all, but Japan still has no concrete treatment plan.


<Anchor>

More than one million tons of contaminated water is currently stored at Fukushima nuclear power plant, and about 200 tons of contaminated water are being accumulated every day. It seems that hundreds of trillion won will be spent only to handle it all, but Japan still has no concrete treatment plan.

I am a reporter, Chung Gu-hee.

<Reporter>

The latest radioactive pollution map released by the Japanese government.

Eight years after the accident, radiation levels are high up to 30km northwest of Fukushima nuclear power plant.

The radiation dose in the center is 11 microsievers per hour, about 36 to 100 times that of Korea's general radiation dose and cannot be accessed or inhabited by people.

Offshore Fukushima, radioactive substances such as cesium are still detected, although below the standard.

If the radioactive wastewater enters the sea, the situation may be worse.

The Fukushima nuclear power plant holds 1.18 million tons of radioactive polluted water, and about 200 tons of groundwater and cooling water are newly accumulated.

Metallic radioactive substances, such as cesium, iodine and plutonium, are tritium in liquid form as a problem for purification.

The threshold for tritium emissions is 60,000 becrel per liter of contaminated water, which has recently surpassed 1 million becquerels.

Various treatment methods are mentioned, but the problem is that the quantity is huge.

[Professor, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University: I will throw (tritium) into the sea, I will evaporate, I will reduce it to hydrogen This way, it's about 600 Olympic pools.]

It is estimated that hundreds of trillion won will be needed to completely remove the radioactive material. For these costs, Greenpeace believes that the Japanese government may choose to dilute polluted water with water.

[Lee Jae-gi / Emeritus Professor, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University: Dilution discharge is possible. Exporting the original concentration too high into the environment (sea) is not a good fit for the protection ethic.]

The Japanese government insists that the storage of contaminated water will reach its limit by 2022, but does not offer specific tritium treatment.

(Image editing: Ha Sung-won)

Source: sbskr

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