Evening sports are better and more effective .. for these reasons

Two recent studies found that exercise in the evening was better than morning. Research in mice showed that exercise performed was about 50 percent better during the evening. It required less oxygen during exercise at night


Two recent studies found that exercise in the evening was better than morning, where research was done on mice that showed that exercise performed was about 50 percent better during the evening.

It required less oxygen during exercise at night, making it more efficient, and had higher levels of an existing substance in the body that increased tissue metabolism.

Both teams say exercise is influenced by our daily rhythms, where our daily hours are connected to the circle of light, or how many hours a day and night.

Where today's day-to-day session plays a role in the repair of DNA, nervous system fertility and drug efficacy.

People who suffer from routine disorders in their daily rhythms also have a lower life expectancy and are more likely to develop cancer, as well as sleep disorders such as insomnia.

These disorders can result either from a "malfunction" in the body's internal clock or from a non-conformity of the body's internal clock with the external environment, such as working at nighttime intervals.

"It is well known that almost every aspect of physiology and metabolism is affected by the daytime cycle," said Dr. Gad Ascher, lead researcher at the Weizmann Institute of Science.

Not only is it important for humans, where each organism is sensitive to light, we decided to ask if there is a connection between time and exercise.

The team put mice on treadmills at different times of the day, and looked at the amount of physical movement exercised by rats with varying intensity and systems.

The researchers found that the performance of mice exercise was about 50 percent better in the evening compared to the morning hours.

In addition, the researchers saw higher levels of the ZMP-labeled metabolite, which is known to increase tissue metabolism.


The team also compared their findings in mice with 12 people, and found that they consumed less energy in the evening, making them more efficient, compared to the morning.

In the second study, the team put the mice on the mills, and looked at how the rodent tissue changed during the exercise.

Where they wanted to analyze how sugar is metabolized and how fat is burned.

The researchers found a protein known as the factor that stimulates 1-alpha hypoxia (HIF-1α), which plays a role in how cells respond to oxygen levels in mammals.

The team felt that it was activated by the body during the exercise in different ways at different times of the day.

However, both groups say the results may not be easy to translate into humans because it depends on the individuals, the amount and hours of sleep versus people who prefer to wake up early.

ref: emara