Consumers are advised to stock up on gifts for Sinterklaas and Christmas because of the current supply problems. Toy stores do not expect to face any real shortages for the upcoming holidays, but do point to longer delivery times. That's what toy sellers such as Intertoys and Lobbes.nl, but also online stores Amazon and bol.com say after a tour.

Intertoys CEO Eddy Assies points to problems that already exist. "It is not to say that there is no problem at all, because you see that the supply is not stable." Everything enters the 215 Intertoys stores in fragments, he says. The warehouses are "crowded," he says. Assies also notices that customers are more likely to buy presents "because they are restless". This also applies to more expensive products such as game consoles such as the PlayStation. "That run on that is normally only at the end of the year."

Online toy specialist Lobbes.nl, which also supplies schools and nurseries, does not foresee any problems due to large stocks, but does receive signals from suppliers that items may arrive later and may become more expensive.

"It is still difficult to estimate what this means for the future, but if the problems persist, our suppliers will also have to switch," says Berry de Snoo, operational manager.

Action says some of the toy range won't hit stores until November and customers who are used to stocking early will notice.

Action therefore expects a "minimal impact" on the prices of toys.

"It will be a final sprint for Sinterklaas and Santa Claus this year," says a spokesperson.

Although bol.com notices longer than usual delivery times for some of the range, the webshop does not expect any complaints for customers.

Bol.com sells 40 percent of the range itself, the rest is offered through partners.

Amazon takes into account that products may not be in stock in the run-up to the holidays, but thinks it can offer enough alternatives.

Still, the company says it can't hurt if consumers buy holiday gifts now.

The same advises De Snoo of Lobbes.nl.

The problems in the logistics chain caused by the pandemic will continue next year, Scott Price, chief executive of delivery company UPS, said recently.

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