The shortage of professionals in the installation industry may double in the next three to five years to 40,000 people if nothing is done.

Chairman Doekle Terpstra of Techniek Nederland warned against this in

De Telegraaf on

Saturday

.

The installation sector, in which approximately 150,000 professionals are employed, is therefore desperate for new staff.

The lack of professionals in the installation industry has led companies to steal staff from each other with handfuls of money.

Entrepreneurs even use headhunters to bring in heating technicians, plumbers and electricians from competitors, says Terpstra of the trade association of installers.

"Companies hire headhunters to steal extra personnel for a few tens of dollars", says Terpstra.

"Many new companies are emerging and large parties are taking over the little ones. The staff shortages are getting bigger and bigger, but this is of course not good for the sector and also not a solution for the lack of professionals."

'Climate goals unsettled'

The staff shortage is so dire that without further action the energy transition and the associated climate goals risk becoming unattainable, warns Techniek Nederland.

"Before 2030, 1.7 million charging points must be installed and one and a half million homes made more sustainable. On January 1, 2023, all office buildings in our country must at least meet energy label C," explains Terpstra.

"That is an enormous task and it demands a lot from the sector and there is no political urgency."

Terpstra also admits that the sector itself has not yet sufficiently succeeded in putting the technical professions in the spotlight.

"We must indeed put our hands in our own bosom. We could have already done what many entrepreneurs now say: I am no longer recruiting people for vacancies, but for the capacities they have. And just as healthcare is now doing in corona time, we have to also looking more for side entrants. For example from professions where there is a surplus. "