Federal Transport Minister Andreas Scheuer (CSU) criticized the ADAC after its neutrality statements in the speed limit debate. "There is definitely no such thing as a 'neutral' waving through on this subject," he told Bild on Sunday . The many ADAC members who want to stay with the current, tried and tested regulation would "make this clear" to the board. Scheuer also pointed out that only a few weeks ago, the Bundestag had overwhelmingly confirmed the existing system of the target speed.

The Vice President of the ADAC, Gerhard Hillebrand, announced on Friday that the automobile club was "no longer fundamentally" against a speed limit. They want to abstain "until further notice a recommendation to the policy on the speed limit".

"The discussion about the introduction of a general speed limit on motorways is emotionally conducted and polarized among the members," said Hillebrand. "That is why the ADAC is currently not stipulating the question." According to Hillebrand, objectification is urgently required. The effects of a speed limit should be urgently clarified in a comprehensive study that "would provide a reliable basis for decision-making".

The background is therefore the "unclear" opinion within the population and among ADAC members on this issue. According to the ADAC, 50 percent of them recently rejected a general speed limit on motorways. The automobile club announced this at the end of December and announced that it would initially forego a recommendation for or against a general speed limit for politicians.

SPD is now also demanding speed limits

Meanwhile, the auto industry is sticking to its no to a general speed limit on highways. The attitude is unchanged, said a spokesman for the Association of the Automotive Industry (VDA). He referred to a statement made at the end of December in which the VDA had described the debate on a general rigid speed limit on German motorways as "not helpful". A speed limit does not help the environment or safety. A significant part of the motorways already include speed limits today. In addition, German motorways are the safest roads and also climate policy, a rigid speed limit on motorways brings next to nothing.

In October, the Greens in the Bundestag failed to push for a general speed limit of 130 kilometers per hour on the motorways. Unlike in October, the SPD is now also demanding a speed limit. The Union is still against a speed limit. Before Christmas, Scheuer said: "We have far more outstanding tasks than putting this highly emotional topic over and over again in the shop window - for which there is no majority at all".