Why the voice can seduce more than a great body

A picture is worth a thousand words and a beautiful body or face attracts more than a sensual voice. Two topics that, like many others, fall under their own weight when science enters


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Marilyn Monroe's 'Happy Birthday' to President Kennedy is a sexual symbol. BETTMAN

A study reveals that women in the fertile period of the menstrual cycle measure the testosterone level of a man who speaks to them

"It is not about what is said but about how it is said," explains a sexologist

A picture is worth a thousand words and a beautiful body or face attracts more than a sensual voice. Two topics that, like many others, fall under their own weight when science enters the scene. And, in recent years, several studies confirm that the voice is essential at the time of seduction. Emulating the courtships and rituals of mating of animals, humans have our own catalog of tricks and techniques that we use, often unconsciously, to throw the loop to our love or sexual interest. It is not as obvious as the deer's bellowing, but almost as effective.

The psychologist and sexologist Marta Pascual states that "to seduce is to reach the other person through the senses and the auditory is one of the strongest. It is not so much what they say to you, but how they tell you. Here comes everything that has to do with the metalanguage: tones, pauses, silences ... that are going to make the same phrase or word produce an approach effect, rejection or neutral response ยป.

The voice can communicate a large amount of social and biological information that can put us to a hundred or leave us cold like an iceberg. "A voice that attracts me," Pascual continues, "can be really powerful , even over an imposing physicist, because the voice is in motion and comes directly to the emotion without any filter. The voice can be pure persuasion. "

As a general rule, women find serious voices more attractive, because they are associated with higher levels of testosterone. On the other hand, men tend to prefer women with sharp voices, because they are perceived as younger and thinner. At least, that's what a study by Sarah A. Collins and Caroline Missing, belonging to the Animal Behavior Study Society of the University of Nottingham, shows .

That way of deciphering voices is something that we carry in our genes and hormones, an element that gives us away associated with fertility. An investigation of the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Saint Andrew, in the United Kingdom, maintains "that women in the fertile period of the menstrual cycle are able to measure the testosterone level of men according to their voice". Other experts point out that men are able to detect the slight changes in the female voice caused by variations in their various sex hormones, such as estrogen and progestin. Thus, a woman in her fertile period finds them more attractive than another woman who is not, without knowing for sure why she is more attracted to them.

Another interesting aspect, already involved in slaughter, is the role played by the voice during the sexual encounter. Telephone sex has saved many relationships from a distance and in the era of online porn the erotic lines continue to exist, so it does not take much more evidence to prove its effectiveness. "The crux of the matter," says Marta Pascual, "is to learn what the other wants to receive at that moment and what I want to give and receive: words, moans, whispers, silences ...". In a first encounter or a crazy night it is difficult to know what kind of expressions ignite or extinguish the desire of the other, but "knowing the erotic map of your partner is a great enhancer of success in sexual encounter," he concludes.

When the two things come together, that is, attractive physical and sexy voice, both are fed back. For that it is enough to think of Marilyn Monroe singing happy birthday to JFK, or Chris Hemsworth, Thor himself, owner of a voice capable of melting what is left of the Arctic. So any.

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REF: https://www.elmundo.es/papel/historias/2019/01/12/5c374b87fdddff2b508b466e.html